Charlwood Village

Charlwood Village

One of the things that makes the parish of Charlwood special is the rich history of the village. Mesolithic camps have been found in Charlwood dating back to 5000 BC. St Nicholas’ church dates from 1080, only fourteen years after the Norman Conquest. It was extended by the de Gatwyck family in 1280. John de Gatwyck was recorded as going on a crusade in 1311, and some of his descendants still live in the village of Charlwood.

As you run through the historic village of Charlwood, there are several interesting buildings to look out for.

As you approach Charlwood along Lowfield Heath Road, you will see Gatwick Aviation Museum on your right, just before the junction, on both sides of the road sit two prominent farms – Charlwood Place Farm on your right and Spicers Farm on your left – both farms are circa 1700.

As you run along The Street, just before the water station, glance to your left and you will see the remains of a smock mill, burned down in 1901 and now converted in to a cottage.

As you run past the water station you can enjoy some live music from Charlwoods’ own musicians, Rawbones on Blue Mountain.

Turning left along Ifield Road on the corner is Charlwood House, home of reputed liaisons between Edward VII and Mrs Simpson!

Just a few metres further on the right, you come to Dolby Green, a medieval barn adjoining an open hall house, and once the headquarters of the volunteer Fire Brigade. Immediately after Dolby Green you will see a small non-conformist chapel, dating from 1890’s, it is now converted to a house.

Further along Ifield Road there are houses of all periods, look out for the three that are circa 1450, one on the left and two on the right.

As you head out of Charlwood, the steep roof of Fulbrooks Cottage on your right, shows that at one time it would have been thatched.

There is not the time to really enjoy all the delights of Charlwood, so do head back one day and pick up a booklet giving a guided walking tour taking in just some of the many period buildings there are to see.